business directory
more businesses...
community in focus
our top stories

Martinez Citizen of the Year Awards Dinner
Apr 13, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
On Saturday, April 26, we will be honoring citizens from the community for their contributions to the betterment of Martinez. The event will take place at the Martinez Event Center, 524 Main Street...


Lion's Club Egg Hunt in Martinez
LION’S CLUB EASTER EGG HUNT is this Saturday, April 19 at 10:00am at the Waterfront Park Grass Area. Event is for  ages 2 - 9 yars old. Enjoy face painting and bring your own camera to take picture...
Apr 12, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Egg Hunt and Boutique in Pleasant Hill
The "Egg"-Citing Egg Hunt in Pleasant Hill is on Saturday, April 19th at Pleasant Hill Park! Start times vary by age group! Sign up early for this spring-time tradition in beautiful Pleasant Hill P...
Apr 05, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
PHBA'sParent Appreciation Luau!
The Pleasant Hill Baseball's Parent Appreciation Luau is Saturday, May 3 at the Pleasant Hill Community Center. Doors open at 6:00pm and dinner is at 7:30pm. This is a fun filled evening with dinne...
Apr 05, 2014 | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend
full story


ktvu 2 rss feeds
local news »

Officials say a 16-year-old boy is "lucky to be alive" and unharmed after flying from San Jose to Hawaii stowed away in a plane's wheel well, surviving cold temperatures at 38,000 feet and a lack of oxygen.

"Doesn't even remember the flight," FBI spokesman Tom Simon in Honolulu told The Associated Press on Sunday night. "It's amazing he survived that."

The boy was questioned by the FBI after being discovered on the tarmac at the Maui airport Sunday morning with no identification, Simon said.

"Kid's lucky to be alive," Simon said.

Simon said security footage from the San Jose airport verified that the boy from Santa Clara hopped a fence to get to Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 on Sunday morning. The child had run away from his family after an argument, Simon said.

Simon said when the Boeing 767 landed in Maui, the boy hopped down from the wheel well and started wandering around the airport grounds.

"He was unconscious for the lion's share of the flight," Simon said. The flight lasted about 5 1/2 hours.

Hawaiian Airlines spokeswoman Alison Croyle said airline personnel noticed the boy on the ramp after the flight arrived and immediately notified airport security.

"Our primary concern now is for the well-being of the boy, who is exceptionally lucky to have survived," Croyle said.

The airport manager in Maui said it was remarkable the boy survived the flight.

"I would imagine flying at 35,000 feet, very cold," said Maui Airport duty manager Marvin Moniz. "Also being at 35,000 feet it is not pressurized or temperature control. It's a miracle to have survived."

A photo taken by a Maui News photographer shows the boy sitting upright on a stretcher as authorities get ready to load him into an ambulance.

Simon said the boy was medically screened and found to be unharmed.

His misadventure immediately raised security questions. A congressman who serves on the Homeland Security committee wondered how the teen could have sneaked onto the airfield at San Jose unnoticed.

"I have long been concerned about security at our airport perimeters. #Stowaway teen demonstrates vulnerabilities that need to be addressed," tweeted Rep. Eric Swalwell, a Democrat who represents the San Francisco Bay Area's eastern cities and suburbs.

A Mineta San Jose International Airport spokeswoman said airport police were working with the FBI and the Transportation Security Administration to review security at the facility as part of an investigation.

"Our concern is with this young boy and his family. Thank God he survived and we hope his health is OK," spokeswoman Rosemary Barnes said.

There was no curbside baggage check for Hawaiian Airlines at Mineta Airport in the wake of the incident Monday morning.

Passengers KTVU spoke with Monday were also amazed that the teen survived the flight, but said the incident gave them some concerns about security.

"So you wonder, with all the workers on the tarmac, why didn’t anyone see him and question him," said  Audrey Itow.

Officials at Kahului Airport referred questions to the State Department of Transportation, which did not return a phone call seeking comment. A TSA spokesman who declined to be named referred questions to the FBI and airport authorities.

The boy was released to child protective services and not charged with a crime, Simon said.

In August, a 13- or 14-year-old boy in Nigeria survived a 35-minute trip in the wheel well of a domestic flight after stowing away. Authorities credited the flight's short duration and altitude of about 25,000. Others stowing away in wheel wells have died, including a 16-year-old killed after stowing away aboard a flight from Charlotte, N.C., to Boston in 2010 and a man who fell onto a suburban London street as a flight from Angola began its descent in 2012.

2014-04-21 07:00:35 -0700

An armed male subject who had been barricaded in a San Jose home since Sunday night has been taken into custody, a police sergeant said.

Officers responded to reports of a male subject who fired a gun into the ground and then retreated into a home in the 1700 block of Del Paso Way around 8:05 p.m. Sunday, Sgt. Heather Randol said.

Arriving officers contained the subject into the residence and the police department's MERGE unit responded to the scene, she said.

The male subject surrendered to police and was taken into custody without further incident at about 3:30 a.m. Monday morning, according to Randol.

No injuries were reported, Randol said.

2014-04-21 06:44:33 -0700

The 118th running of the Boston Marathon began under heavy security Monday morning, a year after the bombings near the race's finish line that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others.

A moment of silence was observed and "America the Beautiful" was played over a loudspeaker before the race began for mobility-impaired marathoners. The elite men and women runners were starting later in the morning.

Despite heightened security, the mood was festive at the finish line on Boylston Street. Spontaneous applause broke out as a group of Boston police officers walked near the site of last year's twin bombing and children danced as the Rolling Stones' song "Start Me Up" blared over the loudspeakers.

A total of 35,755 athletes entered the race — the second-largest field in its history, many of them coming to show support for the event and the city that was shocked by the attack on its signature sporting event.

"I can't imagine the number of emotions that are going to be there," said Katie O'Donnell, who was running the marathon last year and made it 25½ miles before she was stopped less than a mile from the finish line when the bombs exploded. "I think I'm going to start crying at the starting line and I'm not sure I'll stop until I cross the finish line."

The most obvious change for this edition of the world's oldest annual marathon was the heavy security presence. State and local police officers were everywhere, even on the rooftops of some buildings.

Helicopters circled above and bomb-sniffing dogs checked through trash cans. Yet for all the security, the atmosphere was calm and friendly.

"I think everybody is being very pleasant," said Jean Bertschman, a Hopkinton resident who comes to watch the start of the marathon most years and had never seen anything close to this level of security. "I think it's going to be a very good race."

Buses bearing the message "Boston Strong" dropped off runners. A banner on one building read: "You are Boston Strong. You Earned This."

Spectators went through tight security checkpoints before being allowed near Hopkinton Common.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said officials were trying to keep a traditional family feel to the marathon while maintaining tight security.

As he started the mobility-impaired race, Patrick said he encountered a woman who had suffered a brain injury in last year's attack but was determined to run this year.

"Just before we set off the runners, she burst into tears," the governor said.

Runners attending the event will have to use clear plastic bags for their belongings, and fans hoping to watch near the finish line are encouraged to leave strollers and backpacks behind. More than 100 cameras have been installed along the route in Boston, and 50 or so "observation points" will be set up around the finish line "to monitor the crowd," the Boston Athletic Association said.

Race organizers expanded the field from its recent cap of 27,000 to make room for more than 5,000 runners who were still on the course last year at the time of the explosions, for friends and relatives of the victims and for those who made the case that they were "profoundly impacted" by the attack.

Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia and Kenya's Rita Jeptoo, who crossed the finish line on Boylston Street about three hours before the explosions, will return to defend their championships. Desisa returned to Boston last fall to donate his first-place medal to the city as a gesture of support.

Jeptoo, who also won the race in 2006, said she is hoping for a third victory — and one she can enjoy.

"It was very difficult to be happy. People were injured and children died," she said of last year's marathon. "If I'm going to win again, I hope I can be happier and to show people, like I was supposed to last year."

Authorities say two ethnic Chechen brothers who lived in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan and the Dagestan region of Russia planned and orchestrated the marathon bombings with pressure cookers on April 15, 2013.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died following a shootout with police days after the bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20, has pleaded not guilty to federal charges and is awaiting a trial in which he faces a possible death sentence. Prosecutors say the brothers also killed MIT police Officer Sean Collier days after the bombings in an attempt to steal his gun.

2014-04-21 06:44:27 -0700

One north Florida fisherman showed off a massive catch after reeling in an 800-pound shark.

Video shows fisherman Joey Polk of Milton, Fla., pulling the 11-foot mako shark to shore.

Polk said he's been fishing since he was a child, but never expected such a big catch.

Polk with the help of his cousins caught the shark off the Gulf Coast, but the exact location of the catch is a secret.

"These are spots that have been handed down from our grandfathers, to our dads, to us. We like to keep it up a secret. Maybe one day I can pass it down to my kids," said Polk.

Polk did not let his catch go to waste.

He shared the meat at a big community barbecue, feeding a lot of people for free.

But, Polk warned that fishing for sharks is very dangerous, and people should only go out with someone who is experienced.

2014-04-21 06:43:54 -0700

​An elderly Boston woman, whose name has not been released, and her beloved tabby named "Puddy Cat," are out $450,000 in cash and property after making the wrong kind of friends.

WBZ-TV reports 63-year-old Randi Berkowitz and 58-year-old Patricia DiGiacomo are charged with more than 60 counts of embezzlement, larceny and intimidation after they cleaned the 74-year-old woman and her cat completely out.

>> Read more trending stories  

“By the time the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office began their investigation, the victim had $2.16 in her Fidelity account.”

Prosecutors say the two women befriended their victim and took care of her cat just to get access to the victim’s financial assets. (Via Suffolk County District Attorney's Office)

According to the DA’s case statement, the victim, who has been diagnosed with dementia, gave Berkowitz her power of attorney and named her the administrator of her will. (Via Suffolk County District Attorney's Office)

The Boston Globe reports the two women learned the victim had created a “Puddy Cat Trust” in her will, setting money aside for lifetime care for the cat and donations to animal welfare agencies.

According to CNN, the women used that money to buy things like a $27,000 Mini Cooper, an iPad, exercise equipment, specialty kitchen items, and paying for private lawyers.

District Attorney Daniel F. Conley called the scam, "one of the most startling cases of elder exploitation we've seen in years." (Via CNN)

This isn’t the first time the two have had a run-in with the law. They’ve reportedly worked as a team before, masking their identities and taking money from others. (Via Suffolk County District Attorney's Office)

The pair still remain free but they cannot go to the nursing home where the victim now lives and they have to stay away from the cat. They are due back in court May 15.

See more at newsy.com.

2014-04-21 04:54:58 -0700
national news »

entertainment »


more rss feeds...
classified ads
more classifieds...


community candids
calendar

event calendar

post a new event
To view recently posted events
click here